All posts by Angus & Krystle

So many Salmon

This is a grizzly bear sitting in a pool in the Glendale river in Knight Inlet.  The fish that you see are returning Pink Salmon.  On a good return the river is black with fish.  This is important, because our coastal Grizzly Bears rely on the protein rich salmon to put on enough wait to make it through their winter hibernation.

Our “Big Red Suits”

Often the first pictures of the trip at Sailcone’s Grizzly Bear Lodge are of the guests in their big red suits.  Although they don’t make much of a fashion statement they are very warm and most guests are glad that they have them, especially on those chilly mornings.

The Views at Sailcone Pt1

We are blessed with both great wildlife opportunities and some great scenery.  On the four night trip you get to go to the Kakweiken River and visit Trapper Rick’s cabin.  This is his view from the deck, complete with “Andy” the bear.

view at ricks

Humpback in the Fog

In August and early September it is common to get some fog while whale watching in the early morning.  Usually by eleven this marine layer burns off and we enjoy a sunny afternoon.  It can make finding the whales a little more difficult in the early morning, but does make for some peaceful and dramatic scenes.  It is amazing how far the sounds of the whale’s blow travels on a calm foggy morning.

Who is Watching Who

One of the nice things about viewing the grizzly bears from the viewing platform is that they tend to ignore you entirely.  This is great as it is low impact viewing, allowing the bears to go about their business.  Once and a while a bear will glance up and check out the people.  Cubs are often especially curious and will give a stare to the lucky guests.

Into the Estuary

We use speedboats to get from the lodge to the bear viewing area.  They are fast and comfortable, but draw too much water to be effective for bear watching in the shallow estuary.  For that reason we transfer over into a small flat bottomed skiff.  Often the guide will use chest waders and just pull the boat along quietly in the shallow waters.  This lets us get good views of the bears, without disturbing their routine.