Grizzly Bear and Wildlife Tour Blog

We offer an exceptional fly-in lodge for Grizzly Bear Watching and Whale Watching in British Columbia.

Learn about What’s happening at the Lodge, view our British Columbia’s Wildlife Report, read our Grizzly Bear Watching Blog and Whale Watching Blog. Learn more about a Day on the River Blog, see Our Tour Guide’s Photos & Blog and  Photos from Our Guests.

Wildlife Babies 5 of 5

black bear cubs

Early June, so less than six months old and we find two black bear cubs while on the trip up Knight Inlet to view grizzly bears. Although we go on a specialized black bear trip on your first evening in the lodge we frequently see black bears while on the grizzly bear and whales watching tours as well as the trip to Trapper Rick’s.

Wildlife Babies 4 of 5

bald eagles soaring

Bald eagles are only achieve their white headed between three and five years and prior to that they are able to sit in trees unnoticed. When soaring high an immature eagle is a little more noticeable. Still majestic with their wing span but something is missing.

Wildlife Babies 3 of 5

baby orca in a slip stream

One of my best and again luck dominates skill. I knew the orca was going to pass beneath the boat but did not know that its calf would be traveling in mother’s slip stream. The baby swims close to its mother and can be carried in the a type of hydrodynamic wake, which develops as the mother swims. This helps the baby swim with less energy and enables the mother and calf to keep up with the pod.

 

Wildlife Babies 2 of 5

mother grizzly and cub

Grizzly bears mate in the spring and their babies are born from January to March so it can live in its den for about four months during the coldest weather. The grizzly bear cubs of Knight Inlet first appear on the shore with their mothers in late May. This meas the cubs are three to four months old and will remain with their mothers or two or three years. Although still nursing this cub copies mother and will start on solid food.

Wildlife Babies 1 of 5

humpback whale calf

Humpback whales migrate to tropical or subtropical water in the winter to breed and give birth in February and March. By the time the whales return to our viewing areas the calf’s are close to four months old and still on their mother’s milk. This calf is a larger and therefore in it’s second year. These calves are normally very active frequently seen breaching and lobbtailing.

 

 

Grizzly Cub Peek-a-Boo

This photo was taken on our river trip.  We were lucky to have a mother bring her cub through the yard while we sat quietly and watched.  The mother was very relaxed as she stopped to forage on some grass.  They cub took a moment to do a bit of “people watching” before continuing to feed with her mother.

Bald eagle swimming with a salmon

Bald eagle swimmingBald eagle with salmon

Seeing a bald eagle swim is not a common sight on our wildlife tours maybe once or twice a summer. But this morning we saw three take a salmon to shore. An eagle will catch a fish in their talon that is too heavy for them to carry and they will swim to shore with it so they can eat it. They use a butterfly like swim stroke. In the first photo it is almost to the shore and the second show the eagle lifting the fish further up the shore. In this case its mate came down and took the salmon, as it was to exhausted to fight. The happy ending was that it did get to share the fish once it recovered.

Gourmet Dinning

dinner dinner

As our website states; “Gourmet level – lots of Dungeness crab, fresh local prawns, salmon, as well as vegetable and meat dishes. At Grizzly Bear Lodge we have always taken pride in providing quality home cooked meals for our visiting guests.  Local sea food and meat dishes, along with home made breads and desserts.  After a full day of wildlife viewing we all sit down together to enjoy a meal and discuss the days adventures.”  The adventure discussion often lasts long after the meal as the guides share the table and try to keep to the rule: “What happens in the boat stays in the boat unless mentioned by the guest.”

Spring dining for a grizzly bear

grizzly on the beach

Until the salmon arrive in the river in late August the grizzly bears of Knight Inlet find their food on the beach. This bear was scrapping mussels and barnacles from the rocks to obtain the protein necessary to keep it alive. These are eaten “in the shell” and with our motor turned off we can hear the crunching as well as the scrapping of claws. This look was “you are in my comfort zone” so we slowly backed off a few meters.